Dell Upton

PROFESSOR, ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY

Ph.D. Brown University, 1980
Phone 310-206-8370
Email dupton@humnet.ucla.edu
Office Dodd 200B
Office Hours: Varies by quarter

BIOGRAPHY

Dell Upton is a historian of architecture, material culture, and cities. He focuses both on the United States and on the global scene and his books include Another City: Urban Life and Urban Spaces in the New American Republic (2008) and Architecture in the United States (1998), a volume in the Oxford History of Art series, as well as Holy Things and Profane: Anglican Parish Churches in Colonial Virginia (1986); and Madaline: Love and Survival in Antebellum New Orleans (1996). He has had a longstanding interest in African-American history, architecture and material culture, and early in his career in studied landscapes of slavery. In recent years, he has been more interested in the urban and rural landscapes of the post-emancipation period. What Can and Can’t Be Said, a study of civil-rights and African-American history monuments in the South, was recently published in 2015. He is also working on a revised and enlarged edition of Architecture in the United States.

 

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

  • What Can and Can’t Be Said: Race, Uplift, and Monument-Building in the Contemporary South (Yale, 2015)
  • Another City: Urban Life and Urban Spaces in the New American Republic (Yale, 2008). Winner, Society of Architectural Historians Spiro Kostof Book Prize.
  • Architecture in the United States (Oxford, 1998). Winner, Vernacular Architecture Forum Abbott Lowell Cummings Award.
  • Madaline: Love and Survival in Antebellum New Orleans (Georgia, 1996). Winner, Louisiana Literary Award.
  • Holy Things and Profane: Anglican Parish Churches in Colonial Virginia (Architectural History Foundation/MIT, 1986; Yale, 1997). Winner, American Studies Association John Hope Franklin Publication Prize; Society of Architectural Historians Alice Davis Hitchock Book Prize; Vernacular Architecture Forum Abbott Lowell Cummings Award.
  • Common Places: Readings in American Vernacular Architecture, edited with John Michael Vlach (Georgia, 1986)
  • America’s Architectural Roots: Ethnic Groups That Built America (Preservation Press, 1986).
  • “Noah, Solomon, Saladin and the Fluidity of Architecture,” Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, 68 no. 4 (December 2009).
  • “Signs Taken for Wonders,” Instruction and Provocation, or Relearning from Las Vegas, special issue, Visible Language 37 no. 3 (October 2003).
  • “Architecture in Everyday Life,” New Literary History 33 no. 4 (autumn 2002).

 

SELECTED COURSES TAUGHT, UNDERGRADUATE

  • Architecture in the Modern World
  • Los Angeles: The Cluster
  • Cities in History
  • American Houses
  • American Architecture

 

SELECTED COURSES TAUGHT, GRADUATE

  • Methods of Art History
  • Theories of Everyday Life
  • American Architecture: Becoming Modern

 

SELECTED LINKS