David Scott

PROFESSOR, ART HISTORY AND UCLA/GETTY CONSERVATION PROGRAM

Ph.D. University College, London, 1982
Phone 310-794-4855
Email dascott@humnet.ucla.edu
Office Fowler A210

BIOGRAPHY

David A. Scott holds a joint appointment as Professor in Art History and Archaeology. He has degrees from the University of Reading and the University of London and a Ph.D.in ancient metallurgy from University College, London in 1982. From 1981-1987 he was a lecturer at the Department of Conservation and Materials Science, Institute of Archaeology, London, and Head of the Museum Research Laboratory at the J. Paul Getty Museum from 1987-2002, before joining the UCLA faculty. He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry in 1992 and a fellow of the International Institute for Conservation in 1994. Since 1984 he has served as editor for the international journal, Studies in Conservation. His book Copper and Bronze in Art: Corrosion, Colorants, Conservation won the prize from the Association of American Publishers as the best Scholarly/Art book published in the USA in 2002. He is the author of over 70 published papers. His current research interests focus on the problems of the identification of pigments, the metallography of art objects, and the conservation of ancient metallic artifacts.

 

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

  • Copper and Bronze in Art: Corrosion, Colorants, Conservation. The Getty Press, 2002.
  • Co-editor, Metallography and Microstructure of Ancient and Historic Metals: The Getty Press, 1991.
  • Co-editor, Archaeometry of Pre-Columbian Sites and Artifacts: UCLA/The Getty, 1992.
  • Co-author, Ancient and Historic Metals: Conservation and Research: 1991.
  • Iron and Steel: Corrosion, Colorants, Conservation: Archetype Press, 2009.

 

SELECTED COURSES TAUGHT, UNDERGRADUATE

  • AH C172A Preservation of Art: Lecture, three hours. Designed for Anthropology and Art History majors and other juniors/seniors. Introduction to preservation of cultural heritage materials, including what should be preserved and why, as well as who should be involved in decision-making process. Discussion of issues of preservation and restoration of these cultural heritage materials both in museum and outdoor environment contexts. Materials and techniques used to make cultural heritage materials, in relation to preservation efforts needed to prevent decay and loss. Introduction to examples of conservation issues related to sites, buildings, monuments, and collections. Ethical and contextual aspects with reference to changing values, illustrating how cultural materials may have been treated differently according to those values.
  • AH C172 Art: Fakes, Forgeries, and Authenticity: Examination of concepts of authenticity, originality, fakes, and forgeries in art. Overview of problems inherent in concept of authenticity and description of many examples of problems related to this concept in series of discussions based on objects from variety of cultures. Introduction to subject of fakes and account of three different areas of connoisseurship that are essential component of production, study, and scientific examination of fakes. Nature of art connoisseurship described in many examples from Renaissance and earlier panel paintings, as well as antiquities and traditional African arts. Background of art restoration and art conservation discussed in relationship to authenticity and technical studies. Scientific tools that form basis of another kind of connoisseurship described in terms of dating techniques that can be applied directly to works of art and technical methods by which material constituents of works of art are studied.

 

SELECTED COURSES TAUGHT, GRADUATE

  • AH C272C Art: Fakes, Forgeries, and Authenticity: Examination of concepts of authenticity, originality, fakes, and forgeries in art. Overview of problems inherent in concept of authenticity and description of many examples of problems related to this concept in series of discussions based on objects from variety of cultures. Introduction to subject of fakes and account of three different areas of connoisseurship that are essential component of production, study, and scientific examination of fakes. Nature of art connoisseurship described in many examples from Renaissance and earlier panel paintings, as well as antiquities and traditional African arts. Background of art restoration and art conservation discussed in relationship to authenticity and technical studies. Scientific tools that form basis of another kind of connoisseurship described in terms of dating techniques that can be applied directly to works of art and technical methods by which material constituents of works of art are studied.
  • AH 273 Studies in Materials and Production of Artworks: Designed to expose students to material properties and technical production issues related to making of artworks. Introduction to processes of construction, fabrication, maintenance, preservation, and more. Hands-on demonstrations and workshops to deepen understanding of significance of choices that artists make in choice of materials. Processes of making that can impact final physical forms as well as aesthetic meanings that can attach to it. Combination of theoretical, ethical, and practical questions that confront conservators as well as those specializing in technical art history.

 

SELECTED LINKS